by Robert A. Katz
Professor of Law (Faculty Profile)
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law
Lawrence W. Inlow Hall, Room 349
530 W. New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202-3225

[Editor’s Note: This article departs from the typical format and citation style of the Indiana Law Review Blog in the interest of providing commentary on the passage of Senate Bill 101, commonly referred to as the “Religious Freedom Restoration Act,” or RFRA. This article consists of abbreviated remarks presented by the author to the House Judiciary Committee of the Indiana General Assembly on March 16, 2015, 10 days before the bill was signed into law by Indiana Governor Mike Pence.]


Good day. My name is Robert Katz. I am a professor of law at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law where I teach First Amendment law and law and religion. My research focuses on the tension between religious freedom and anti-discrimination law. It is one of my most profound concerns as a citizen, a parent, and a member of the Jewish community.

The freedom of religion is one of our most fundamental rights as Americans. Yet, also precious to us as citizens are our civil rights and, most relevantly here, our right to be free from discrimination.

As I understand it, this bill has two main goals.

Andrew Klein
Dean and Paul E. Beam Professor of Law
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law
Lawrence W. Inlow Hall, Room 227H
530 W. New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202-3225
Faculty Profile Webpage
Twitter: @anrklein


Thanks to the editors of the Indiana Law Review for inviting my comments. I applaud your efforts to expand the journal’s scope and reach.

This post marks a personal anniversary of sorts. I have been dean of our school for a year, and it would be impossible to describe the experience in a short essay. But as a renowned philosopher once said, “We do not learn from experience . . . we learn from reflecting on experience.” [1]. So indulge me some brief reflections.