The legislature, understanding that law alone is not always enough, left room for community members to come alongside members who are the target of discrimination and support them in demanding equality in housing. When a housing provider discriminates against a protected class, the community can directly voice its support for the targeted community member, and the community can voice its complaint against the housing provider to the Indiana Civil Rights Commission on the basis that the entire community is injured when diversity is divested. Together, community members can stand against discrimination in housing and turn a legal requirement into to the touchstone of Indiana’s housing culture by using the Indiana Fair Housing Act to demand equality in housing and reaffirm that “[i]njustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

In Gideon v. Wainwright, the Supreme Court held that all criminal defendants facing serious criminal charges are entitled to the assistance of counsel, regardless of whether they can afford an attorney. In the years since Gideon, however, the provision of public defense to those who cannot afford counsel has fallen far short of the ideal expressed in Gideon that “every defendant stands equal before the law.” The failure of public defense systems to provide adequate representation to indigent defendants is often caused by severe underfunding and has resulted in the chronic appointment of “incompetent or inexperienced” counsel; delays in the appointment of counsel and discontinuity of attorney representation; a lack of training and oversight for counsel representing indigent defendants; excessive public defender caseloads and understaffing of public defender offices; inadequate or nonexistent expert and investigative resources for defense counsel; and a lack of meaningful attorney-client contact.

One response to these failings—as is often the case when constitutional violations are afoot—has been to challenge them in court. The focus of this short Article is on how the courts can address and have addressed the failings of underfunded and structurally flawed indigent defense systems. More specifically, it explores lawsuits that identify systemic failures—such as underfunding, excessive caseloads, and inadequate training and oversight—and seeks system-wide remedies capable of transforming the provision of defense services.

Roger Owen DeBruler died on February 13, 2017, at the age of eighty-two. He was the longest serving justice on the Indiana Supreme Court during the twentieth century – the third longest serving justice ever – and his influence on Indiana jurisprudence is pervasive. I had the great good fortune to serve on the Court during the final three years of his tenure and am honored that the Indiana Law Review has asked me to prepare a tribute to him for publication.

The Indiana Law Review is pleased to announce the following members have been selected for its Volume 52 Editorial Board. We look forward to their leadership and contributions to legal scholarship throughout the 2018-19 academic year. Congratulations!

J. Mitchell Tanner, Editor-in-Chief
Nicole Dobias, Executive Managing Editor
Riley Parr, Executive Notes Editor
Carla Uhlarik, Senior Executive Editor
Courtney Abshire, Executive Articles Editor
Amelia Marvel, Executive Articles Editor
Sarah Correll, Symposium Editor
Henry Robison, Executive Online Editor

Note Development Editors:
Thomas Buchanan
Amy Burbrink
Christopher Frank
Elizabeth Hyde

Articles Editors:
Michael Daniells
Alyssa Devine
Charles Richert
E. Ryan Shouse

There is convincing evidence that persons in nursing homes, even persons with dementia in its later stages, benefit physically, mentally, and emotionally from close contact with loved ones, including conversation, touch, hugs and embraces, kissing, and sex. Nevertheless, nursing homes often discourage ongoing intimate relationships because of logistical, financial, and other considerations.