The Federal Sentencing Guidelines were originally imposed by Congress in the Sentencing Reform Act of 1984 (SRA). This statute was an attempt to create a determinate sentencing system, which included large-scale elimination of parole and severe restriction of good time credit in order to create a system in which criminals would serve most or all of the time to which they were sentenced.

For nearly 100 years prior to the enactment of the SRA, the U.S. federal criminal system was an indeterminate sentencing system, under which “[s]tatutes specified the penalties for crimes but nearly always gave the sentencing judge wide discretion” in whether an individual should be incarcerated and for how long, and as to whether the use of parole was appropriate. 

JUSTICE STEVEN H. DAVID |  JUDGE CALE J. BRADFORD  

Crime doesn’t pay; it costs. In addition to serving a sentence or probation, a convicted criminal may be ordered to pay for his or her crime(s), literally.

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Our goal is to have this Article serve as a one-stop guide to trial court judges and practitioners about the types of criminal debt that defendants may be ordered to pay and the requirements and guidelines for imposing each.

 

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The Indiana Law Review is pleased to announce that the following students have been selected as Note Candidates for Volume 51.  We look forward to their contributions to legal scholarship over the coming school year. Congratulations!

Courtney Abshire Julie Ardelean Nick Bognanno
Thomas Buchanan Amy Burbrink Sarah Correll
Michael Daniells Alyssa Devine Nicole Dobias
Chris Frank Brendan Hogan Elizabeth Hyde
Trevor Johnson JooRi Kim Bradley Lohsl
Amelia Marvel Kevin McCusker John Millikan
Riley Parr Charles Richert Haley Roach
Henry Robison Eric Shouse Eileen Smart
Joseph Tanner Carla Uhlarik